By JESSE SHEPPARD, reporter
Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018

The 2018 Volleyball season has concluded with Sterling ranked fifth in the KCAC (Kansas Collegiate Athletics Conference). The team won its championship game against York, but was unable to defeat the University of Saint Mary in the tournament quarterfinals. They finished the season with seventeen wins and fifteen losses overall.

With the season over, the volleyball seniors took a moment to reflect on their season. Kristen Calderwood, a senior majoring in biology and a defensive specialist for the volleyball team enjoyed her final season at Sterling.

“I think this season was the best one we’ve had while I’ve been at Sterling,” Calderwood said, “We had a couple tough games, but we ended up in the top half of the conference. It was definitely a season to remember.”

Calderwood said that the team has genuinely impacted her throughout her years at Sterling.

“They [Calderwood’s teammates] have challenged me to be more outgoing, taught me how to maturely handle conflict, demonstrated incredible work ethic, and shown me love and grace in action. I am a much better person because of them,” she said.

Alexandra Reid is a senior Exercise Science major and a defensive specialist for Sterling College Volleyball. She is the all-time career leader in digs at Sterling College with 1,749 career digs. She is ranked fifteenth in NAIA Division 1 for total digs with 700 digs in the 2018 season. Reid said that the 2018 season had been challenging but strong.

“We had a rough start, but we got better as the season went on. We always fought hard even when things didn’t go our way, and [we] finished fifth in conference,” Reid said, “Out of my four years, this was my favorite team because we all got along, which made our team have great chemistry.”

Caitlyn Wood is a senior Athletic Training Major and four-time team manager for Sterling Volleyball. Wood was impressed with how the team challenged each other to grow this year, noting that some women have improved immensely over the past year.

“She [Breanne Akiu] is only a sophomore but she has grown so much both as a player and a woman. Her skill level and confidence on the court has improved so much. She is good on the court both mentally and physically. I cannot wait to see the player she turns into,” Wood said.

Wood reflects on the year with hope for the promising talent she witnessed this season.

“We had a lot of new great talent that will be good in future seasons once it is pushed to grow. I hope to see people grow and pushed outside their boundaries,” she said, “I have faith in the coaching staff and the team.”

 

By JESSE SHEPPARD, reporter
Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018

On Monday night, the Potato Club hosted a Thanksgiving Feast for the students of Sterling College in Heritage Hall. The event began at 7 P.M. and ran for over an hour.

The club served a traditional meal of mashed potatoes and gravy, turkey, stuffing and macaroni, alongside pie and sparkling cider. The event also included time to fill out numerous “thank you” cards for Sterling faculty members.

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Students gathered in the hall at seven, and quickly filled the room. Ashley Dodge, an SC senior and the club publicist was surprised by the large turnout.

“It went better than we expected,” Dodge said, “We were really excited when a lot of people came, and it was good to see their excitement within their fellowship together.”

The students sat with their food and enjoyed each other’s company as the event came to an end. The event concluded with a large selection of “thank you” cards for students to show their appreciation of the entire Sterling College staff.

Brett Couture, a Resident Director at Sterling enjoyed his time at the event, and he was glad to see the student’s appreciation and spirit.

“I enjoyed seeing everyone and signing the cards for all of the awesome people who work on this campus,” Couture said.

Shelby Stowe, Potato Club Treasurer and Sterling College Senior expressed that having “thank you” cards was a great choice for the atmosphere of the college.

“The cards are an element we chose to encourage students to think about others during this time of thanksgiving,” Stowe said.

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Sterling Senior and Potato Club President Chloe Heard shared her appreciation for those who made the event possible.

“Thanksgiving is a time to be thankful. I would like to thank Caitlin and Anthony Glaze for letting us use their space to make all of this food,” Heard said.

Heard also discussed the preliminary plans for their upcoming Spring semester event.

“Bring out your fancy dresses,” Heard said, “Our next event in the works is the ‘Potato Prom’ in the Spring.”

By KAITLYNN LITTLE, reporter
Monday, Nov. 12, 2018

College students and local families hurried out of the cold and into the Sterling United Methodist Church on Broadway St., Monday evening, to order warm drinks and snacks. The second floor of the church, called Connection Café, is set apart for balancing socializing and working on homework.

The café is meant to be a space for all who enter to experience the love and grace of Jesus. It is meant to be an inviting atmosphere where friendships can be strengthened and burdens can be shared.

The Connection Café was founded in memory of Jacob Oden. This café was his vision, though God called him home before he was able to see it become a reality. Jacob had named the café and came up with some of the new drink ideas. Memorial money was given in his honor to furnish the space for it. His heart for service is remembered through the existence and purpose of the café.  

 The café space was dedicated to the glory of God on October 19, 2016. Since then, many students have made it their space away from college.

“I come about roughly every week. I actually also work here and am one of the people who attended and helped out-right from the start. I really enjoy the community here and the mission to reach people during study time has always appealed to me. The Connection Café is a fun place away from campus, with cheap coffee, good company, and a place to work,” senior Brianna Chastain said.

Brianna and her friends sat behind their laptops circled around a coffee table, all focused on their screens yet taking moments to reach for their coffee mug and take a sip every now and then.

“I usually come every other week. The atmosphere is just extremely relaxing. I can come to the Connection Café for multiple reasons, whether it be completing a big assignment or catching up with friends,” junior Kaylyn Oberle said.

“One of my favorite memories during one of those friend nights, was when I decided to hide a few of their bookbags and laptops around the church. They found them within 30 minutes or so and then proceeded to steal my keys while I wasn’t looking, go move my car, and then wait for me to notice it when it was time to leave. All of that extended from a fun night of fellowship at the Connection Café. I really appreciate the awesome environment. Coffee is a great bonus as well!” Oberle said.

Students come to enjoy the space and the beverages, but students are also behind the counter working as baristas.

“Working here has been a very growing, new, and relaxing experience for me. I’ve worked in the coffee business for two years now and I love the environment that a coffee shop provides for customers. I love working here at Connection because I think it’s so special that this church is using coffee as a way to reach out to the community and provide inexpensive yet savory coffee for the community,” freshman Emma Kwasiborski said.

Besides food and doing homework, students also enjoy playing board games and table tennis there too. Their menu includes: lattes, hot chocolate, steamers, affogatos, pop, Gatorade, water, Capri Sun drink; and cookies, chips, candy, granola bars, popcorn, and pop tarts.

The Connection Café is located on 137 N. Broadway. They are open from 7-10 p.m. each Monday night. If you have any questions, feel free to contact Jeff Darnauer at 620-474-1102 or at jdarnauer@sterling.edu. 

 


By HANNAH ABBATE, reporter
Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018

Saturday afternoon the Warriors drove to North Newton, Kan. for their final game of the season. Their opponent was Bethel College.

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The Thrashers were (2-7) going into Saturday’s game, while the Warriors were (4-5).

The loss to Bethel was hard,” said Nathan Jackson, a freshman tight end. “Being the last game of the season, we wanted to go out on a win but we came up short.”

The Warriors scored first at the start of the game. The first quarter was otherwise scoreless as Sterling led 7-0.

The second quarter was the highest scoring quarter of the game. The two teams battled. Sterling put up 20 points while Bethel gained 14.

Going into halftime the Warriors led 27-14.

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During the third quarter, the Thrashers held the Warriors scoreless. They score a touchdown of their own and turned a two-point conversion after the touchdown to make it 27-22 Sterling.

In the fourth quarter the Thrashers stayed strong and consistent, scoring another 14 points. The Warriors battled back by scoring 7 points of their own, but it wouldn’t be enough to put them over Bethel. The Thrashers won 36-34.

“I think the offense as a whole did really well; we scored 34 points,” Jackson said. “The defense this year is pretty young and they are still learning and growing as athletes. I think the whole team can improve with the mental part of the game, which is doing the right assignment at the right time.”

With a final record of (4-6) for the Warriors, their season comes to an end.

“We have a lot to learn from this season, said Jackson. “I think that this offseason will go really well for us and we will come back next season ready to fight.”

 

 

By HANNAH ABBATE, reporter
Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018

Beginning Monday, November 26th, a weekly Bible study on campus will be open to all women interested in attending.

Bible studies are often used to bring together a group of individuals who may otherwise not gather on their own. They serve to spread the word of God and give advice. Bible studies also help to reach those who might not attend church normally.

The idea for the event comes from Katie O’Brien. As an alumni, O’Brien currently works in the admissions office.

O’Brien grew up in Upland, California, where she developed a love for theatre and music. She headed to Sterling in 2014 to major in Theatre and Communication. After graduating in the spring of 2018 and has returned to campus as the Arts Admissions Counselor.

The Bible study will be open to all women. “It’s about creating long lasting relationships and friendships with women based on our relationship with God,” said O’Brien.

“Originally the idea was just for art students,” O’Brien said. “Performing Arts majors have really weird schedules and its hard for them to go to normal Bible studies.”

O’Brien plans for the Bible study to be a weekly event starting on the 26th of November. It will last seven weeks and meeting will be held at 10p.m.

By JASE BRANDT, reporter
Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018

On Friday, Nov. 9, the Music @ Sterling College club held hosted their fourth annual ’20s Night event in Cornerstone.

“This originated three years ago with M@SC,” M@SC club member Alex Engelken said. “We wanted to do an event that kind of brought awareness to music history and the cool stuff from the past. We picked the ’20s because The Great Gatsby was just coming out in theaters around that time. People were like, ‘Oh, ’20s, that’s so cool.’ So, we started this event and it was a pretty big hit, so we thought we’d try to make it an annual thing. And, so far, it’s been going well.”

The event consisted of music and dancing as well as live vocal performances by Sterling College students. There were also snacks, coffee, and fake cocktails called “mocktails.” Attendees were encouraged but not required to dress up for the event.

“It always surprises me that people actually dress up. I never think that they’re going to but they do,” Engelken said. “Even though it is kind of stressful to put together an event like this, it’s really fun to see different people coming together and dancing and having fun and letting loose and not being afraid to step out of their comfort zone.”

M@SC does not have any other events planned for the remainder of the fall 2018 semester.

Photos by Jase Brandt.

By Kaitlynn Little, reporter
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018

Dr. Roy Millhouse, assistant professor of biblical studies, and Dr. Mark Watney, assistant professor of language and literature, held the second lecture of the Theology+ Lecture Series in the Presentation Lab in Cooper Hall on Wednesday afternoon.

The lecture — “Are Translators Traitors?” — explored how the poetry in the Bible should be interpreted and translated from a theological point of view and a literature point of view.

Millhouse proposed questions like, “How do we get the words of the Bible, written over 2,500 years ago, into something we can understand,” and “How does a translator avoid miscommunicating the text?”

He explained that there are various theoretical models that translators of the Bible consider. The two main ones are Formal Equivalence, meaning that the language is translated word for word, while the other model is called Functional Equivalence, where the language is translated instead into thought for thought.

Translations are more difficult to read the closer they are to Formal Equivalence (a 12th grade reading level; NASB), while Functional Equivalence translations are easier (a 5th grade reading level; MSG).

Millhouse explained that the series is relevant to college students, because we all choose what kind of Bible we like to read from.

“It’s important that you understand what the translators are trying to accomplish with the Bible, because that helps to guide you into what kind of translation that you’d like to use for study. To have an idea of what the translators are trying to accomplish—to know that this is basically a discussion between form and function—then learning the NIV is going to lean a little bit more towards function than the ESV is, if form is important to you, then maybe you want to use the ESV,” Millhouse said.

Dr. Watney introduced literature’s standpoint on translating the Bible by reading Ephesians 2:10, “We are God’s poiema,” using the Greek word for workmanship—meaning poetry. He compared the process of writing poetry to God’s care in creating us.

“To accurately translate the Psalms, you have to look at the poetical form. Because Psalms were written to be performed, to be chanted, to be sung. If you translate it simply as prose, then you lose that performative element. It’s one book in the Bible, that is to be used very differently from any other book in the Bible. We don’t chant through Genesis and we don’t sing through Revelations, but we do with the Psalms. So that has to be taken into account, that the poetical form is essential for the Psalm’s function–what it was written to be,” Watney said.

A question and answer session followed after the speaker’s presentations, and students had an opportunity to ask the two professors their questions about translation.

“I am also very interested in learning about the ways the Bible relates to other aspects of daily life or culture. Learning about the Bible in the context of literature brings more meaning into the scripture that I’m reading,” junior Elizabeth Berens said.

Future lectures to look forward to will occur next semester, and will include a Theology+Science lecture as well as a Theology+Business lecture.